Sklover’s Thought for the Work Week

Published on May 21st, 2018 by Alan L. Sklover

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“The most common way people give up their power is by thinking they don’t have any.”

– Alice Walker

Who is Alice Walker? She is the amazing woman, born to sharecropper parents in rural Georgia in 1944, who became a world-renown essayist, novelist and activist. You may have seen the screen adaptation of her powerful and empowering novel, “The Color Purple.” Little early education . . . never held her back. Her message, above, is one to keep in mind at work, and elsewhere: try not to sell yourself short, no matter how often, and how intensely, others may try to convince you to do so. That is a very important message underlying all of our “Sklover Working Wisdom” efforts.

This quote was sent to us by Hyacinth of Canton, Ohio. Thank you, so much, Hyacinth, from our entire Blog Family. If you would like to submit a proverb, quote or thought, please submit it to us at vanessa@executivelaw.com.

Need a model memo or letter to transmit a request or complaint? A good checklist or form agreement? For a complete list of our Model Letters, Memos, Checklists and Sample Agreements, Just [click here.]

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© 2018 Alan L. Sklover. All Rights Reserved and Strictly Enforced.

Sklover’s Thought for the Work Week

Published on May 14th, 2018 by Alan L. Sklover

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“Each time you say hello to a stranger your heart acknowledges that we are all family.”

– Suzy Kassem

One of my most enduring, enjoyable – and financially rewarding – client relationships started with a simple, “Hi, I’m Al . . . what’s your name?” I was a speaker at a conference, and at lunch break I saw someone at a table, sitting by himself. I introduced myself, as did he, sat down next to him, and then, when others came into the room who I knew, I invited them to join us. For the last 25 years, that fellow sitting by himself has been a client four times, he has recommended me to dozens of new clients, and we keep in touch regularly, despite his having retired. We consider each other almost-brothers. It is kind to say hello to a “stranger,” kinder still to introduce yourself to a stranger, and most kind to introduce a stranger to others. It is great for you, too, in oh-so-many ways. Keep in mind at work, and elsewhere, that the best definition of “a stranger” is “a potential friend, perhaps even a new family member.” You’ll be glad you did.

This quote was sent to us by Richard T. of Chapel Hill, North Carolina. We appreciate your “introducing” us to this quote, Richard. If you would like to submit a proverb, quote or thought, please submit it to us at vanessa@executivelaw.com.

Need to send a model memo or letter to make a request or complaint? A good checklist or form agreement? For a complete list of our Model Letters, Memos, Checklists and Sample Agreements, Just [click here.]

Interested in Membership? It’s free, and has advantages, including discounts on our products. Just [click here.]

Need a private telephone consultation? Just [click here.] Evenings and weekends can usually be accommodated.

© 2018 Alan L. Sklover. All Rights Reserved and Strictly Enforced.

Mother’s Day

Published on May 13th, 2018 by Alan L. Sklover

“God could not be everywhere and
therefore he invented mothers.”

– Jewish Saying

To every mother, grandmother, and great grand-mother out there, THANKS. Today is Your Day. It’s even named after you. In case anyone hasn’t said it to you yet, THANKS for all you do, all you’ve done, and for the zillions of things you will do tomorrow and the day after that, too . . .

© 2018 Alan L. Sklover All Rights Reserved. Commercial Use Prohibited.

Don’t be too Rational . . . It’s not Logical.

Published on May 8th, 2018 by Alan L. Sklover

Two Heads Logical Rational

Workplace Negotiating Insight No. 17: Don’t be too Rational . . . It’s not Logical.

Observe and Learn:

It happens quite often . . . clients share with me their frustration, their disappointment and their difficulties at work due to the seemingly irrational behaviors of others.

Underlying these frustrations and disappointments are their views that some other person they are dealing with is not acting rationally.

Here is an example: “If he just scheduled our team meetings on Friday, then the entire team could attend, and that would prevent so many miscommunications.”

Here is another example, “If she would just approve one more staff member on my team, all 12 of my other team members would be more effective, and we would more than make up the cost. I just don’t understand her thinking.”

Often, my response is this: “It is not wise to expect people to be rational because when you do so, you are not, yourself, being logical. Logical people recognize and incorporate into their expectations that people are both rational and irrational, and often more irrational than rational in nature.”

What so many people miss – and in doing so cause themselves untold difficulties – is that so very much of people’s behavior is not based in rational thought, but rather in emotion.
Some people go so far as to suggest that most of human behavior is not rational, but emotional.

Fear, greed, lust, insecurity, control, pity, revenge, and other emotions so often lurk beneath the surface of daily life, and underlie even our loftiest decisions.

Not taking into account these powerful emotional motivators makes you so rational that you are not, yourself, being logical. And often the key to getting whatever it is you seek lies in your appealing not to others’ rational minds, but rather to their emotional needs.

And, this is not a one-way street. As the saying goes, “Understanding other people’s motivations is very hard. Understanding your own motivations is even harder.”

So, in dealing with others at work, navigating and negotiating through your work day and work life, bear in mind that expecting 100% rationality is so, so often simply illogical.

Observe and Learn.
Then Navigate and Negotiate.

Need to send a memo or letter? A good checklist or form agreement? For a complete list of our Model Letters, Memos, Checklists and Sample Agreements, Just [click here.]

Interested in Membership? It’s free, and has advantages, including discounts on our products. Just [click here.]

Need a private telephone consultation? Just [click here.] Evenings and weekends can usually be accommodated.

© 2018, Alan L. Sklover All Rights Reserved. Commercial Use Prohibited.

Sklover’s Thought for the Work Week

Published on May 7th, 2018 by Alan L. Sklover

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“Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me. Fool me 350,000 times . . . you’re a weatherman.”

– Bill Murray

At work, sometimes it seems that trust is awfully hard to come by, and even when felt, often difficult to maintain. I must admit, I sometimes find my cynical self getting the best of me. It’s just not prudent to be too trusting, especially of those you don’t know well. But It’s not wise to let yourself become truly paranoid. At work, choose slowly and carefully those in whom you choose to place your trust, but don’t turn off your trusting soul entirely. That would be a true shame. Trust me.

This quote was sent to us by Dahlia of Ashdod, Israel. Shalom, Dahlia. If you would like to submit a proverb, quote or thought, please submit it to us at vanessa@executivelaw.com.

Need to send a model memo or letter to make a request or complaint? A good checklist or form agreement? For a complete list of our Model Letters, Memos, Checklists and Sample Agreements, Just [click here.]

Interested in Membership? It’s free, and has advantages, including discounts on our products. Just [click here.]

Need a private telephone consultation? Just [click here.] Evenings and weekends can usually be accommodated.

© 2018 Alan L. Sklover. All Rights Reserved and Strictly Enforced.

Alan L. Sklover

Alan L. Sklover

Employment Attorney
and Career Strategist
for over 30 years

Job Security and Career Success now depend on knowing how to navigate and negotiate to gain the most for your skills, time and efforts. Learn the trade secrets and 'uncommon common sense' of Attorney Alan L. Sklover, the leading authority on "Negotiating for Yourself at Work™".

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