Being Bully-Boss’ed? – The 57 Signs . . . Is It Happening to You?

Published on July 17th, 2018 by Alan L. Sklover

 
“I find in most circumstances people leave bosses,
not companies.”

– John Rampton

ACTUAL CASE HISTORIES: Over the past two years, Nike has terminated five senior executives for being bully bosses – four men and one woman. One of those terminated had been identified as the probable next CEO. A rising tide of bullying at Nike resulted, too, in the CEO calling a “town hall” meeting of all 35,000 Nike employees, at which the CEO apologized for letting it get so out of control, and promised not to let it happen again.

From recent press accounts and a rising number of lawsuits, the incidence of bully bossing seems to be on the rise. It may be that so many managers feel under so much pressure to do so much with so little. It may be a reflection of a seemingly rising incivility throughout society. No matter the cause, workplace bullying seems to have become more common, and is a widely discussed phenomenon.

While employees bear the brunt of workplace bullying, employers are coming to recognize that they are victims of bully bossing, too, as it results in depressed morale, increased law suits, significant distraction, loss of valuable human talent and diminished retention of key employees. Oh, it also poses real risk to very significant reputational damage to brand, which is perhaps the “Achilles heel” of every organization, especially those with great investment into brand development and management.

And, too, it seems “something big” may also be changing: “I’ve been bully boss’ed” is, to many, the new “me-too movement.”

If you think how you are being treated by your own manager may constitute bully bossing, this list of the “57 Signs” may help you in two ways: First, it represents something of a “checklist of abuses” against which you can measure your own treatment so you can draw your own conclusions. Second, if you do conclude that you are, indeed, dealing with a workplace bully boss, this list may assist you in addressing the problem by identifying to Management, HR and even the bully boss, himself or herself, with specificity, the elements of the problem.

LESSON TO LEARN: Two questions often arise in workplace bullying situations:

The first question is: “Do I have just a very tough boss, or has he/she crossed the line to represent a true ‘bully boss?’”

The second question is: “If I am being bully-bossed, how can I address that subject, with the most effective manner and yet, if possible, avoid retaliation?”

Well, as I often tell my clients, “Specificity yields credibility.” By being able to identify what is going on, you can help yourself answer both of those questions. Specificity is necessary to identify a problem – like a blood test or x-ray does for a physician. And, too, specificity may indicate to the physician where to apply the medicine or other treatment, how long it should be applied, and what are the indications of improvement? Well, the same holds true for any problem, including bullying at work: the more specific, the more effective will likely be the diagnosis and treatment.

The list below helps you understand whether you are, indeed, being bullied. It can also help you spot the many ways in which workplace bullying often shows itself. While it is not entirely exhaustive, it does contain most of what we all mean by workplace bullying. And, too, it can assist in your standing up to it.

One thing to keep in mind: bully bossing does not need to be intentional. In fact, many bully bosses are not even vaguely aware of what they do. As they have done it so many times before, without being called out on it, they think it is “normal” managing, which it is not.

This is why it is being said, more and more, “Bully Bossed is the new MeToo Movement.”

WHAT YOU CAN DO: To help make a conclusion about whether you are being bully bossed, and to also help you report it to others, here is a list of 57 signs of bully bossing. Of course, associated issues should be considered, including (a) how often the activity takes place, (b) its intensity, (c) its effects on you, (d) how long it has been taking place, and (e) whether it has continued after you have taken reasonable steps to stop it.
Continue Reading. . .

Sklover’s Thought for the Work Week

Published on July 16th, 2018 by Alan L. Sklover

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“I have not failed.
I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.”

– Thomas A. Edison

Did you know that Steve Jobs was fired the first time he worked for Apple? That Steven Spielberg was rejected both times he applied to film school at USC? That the Beatles were turned down by the first 17 record labels they sought, because no one thought they had any future in the music business? That Michael Jordan wasn’t picked for the varsity basketball team in his high school sophomore year? How about that, at age 65, Colonel Sanders was turned down over 1,000 times when he submitted to investors his business proposal for a chain of fried chicken restaurants? At work, and in everything else you do, bear those strange facts in mind if and when you get dispirited, depressed or discouraged. Successful people keep that light inside burning, no matter how many ways they find do not work. The next try may be the one.

This quote was sent to us by Manny R. of Ronkonkoma, New York. Thanks, Manny, for the uplifting quote, on behalf of our entire blog “family.” If you would like to submit a proverb, quote or thought, please submit it to us at vanessa@executivelaw.com.

Need a model memo or letter to transmit a request or complaint? A good checklist or form agreement? For a complete list of our Model Letters, Memos, Checklists and Sample Agreements, Just [click here.]

Interested in Membership? It’s free, and has advantages, including discounts on our products. Just [click here.]

Need a private telephone consultation? Just [click here.] Evenings and weekends can usually be accommodated.

© 2018 Alan L. Sklover. All Rights Reserved and Strictly Enforced.

Did You Hear? It Seems More Employees are Quitting Their Jobs

Published on July 10th, 2018 by Alan L. Sklover

I quit

According to Government Statistics, More Employees are Quitting Their Jobs Than Have Done so for Decades

According to recently published reports, more and more employees are voluntarily quitting their jobs, with or without having a new job lined up first.

U.S. Dept. of Labor Statistics show that during April of this year, 3.4 million Americans quit their jobs, a 17-year high, twice the 1.7 million employees who were laid off during the same period last year. The trend, it seems, cuts across all industries.

The Labor Department credits the strong economy, and the historically low unemployment rate – just 3.8% during April – for employees having the confidence to 
engage in “job hopping.”

Oddly, this seeming confidence and job-hopping is not reflected in any broad-based increase in wages, which have remained sluggish for decades.

Nor do the published reports indicate how many of these departures may actually have been employees leaving their jobs under threat of termination, for health reasons, or due to such circumstances as bullying or unreasonable workloads.

Whether you are considering quitting your job to find “greener pastures” elsewhere, or under threat of some kind, it is important that you devote time and effort to doing it carefully. It can make all the difference.

For example, consider taking a few minutes to review our blog post entitled “Resigning – The 21 Necessary Precautions.” To do so, just [click here.]

You may also be interested in obtaining a copy of our Master Pre-Resignation 100-Point Checklist. To do so, just [click here.]

And, too, other Model Resignation Memos and Letters are available by [clicking here.]

It is often said that the hardest part of any relationship is ending it well. That goes for the employment relationship as much, if not more so, than any other.

To see a list of all of our Model Letters, Memos, Checklists and Agreements – that show you “What to Say and How to Say It” in hundreds of different workplace situations – just [click here].

If you would like to arrange a Telephone Consultation with Mr. Sklover, just [click here].

Whatever you do . . . why not do it well?

“You are not alone, at work, any more.”

© 2018 Alan L. Sklover All Rights Reserved and Strictly Enforced.

Sklover’s Thought for the Work Week

Published on July 9th, 2018 by Alan L. Sklover

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“To be successful you must accept all challenges that come your way. You can’t just accept the ones you like.”

– Mike Gafka

At work and elsewhere, challenges can be fun and exciting. But, more often than not, they will be frightening, exhausting, foreboding, and near-overwhelming. Don’t run from any of them; accept them all. Each is an opportunity to test your strengths, and to confront your doubts, fears and limits, and, in the process, build your self-confidence like nothing else can do for you.

This quote was sent to us by Zoie from Fort Wayne, Indiana. Our thanks go out to you, Zoie, on behalf of our entire blog “family.” If you would like to submit a proverb, quote or thought, please submit it to us at vanessa@executivelaw.com.

Need a model memo or letter to transmit a request or complaint? A good checklist or form agreement? For a complete list of our Model Letters, Memos, Checklists and Sample Agreements, Just [click here.]

Interested in Membership? It’s free, and has advantages, including discounts on our products. Just [click here.]

Need a private telephone consultation? Just [click here.] Evenings and weekends can usually be accommodated.

© 2018 Alan L. Sklover. All Rights Reserved and Strictly Enforced.

Independence Day

Published on July 4th, 2018 by Alan L. Sklover

“The bravest things we do in our lives are usually known only to ourselves.”

– Peggy Noonan

You might not have thought about it, but Lady Liberty always stands by herself. The quest to be free, and to help others be free, is first and foremost an internal quest. When my mother was a child, she arrived in New York harbor on a boat, and she no doubt saw Lady Liberty standing there, all by herself. At that moment, I’m certain my mother felt less alone. Just as Lady Liberty does each day, so, too, can each of us do something – however small – to help someone be free: free from hunger, free to express his or herself, free to pray (or not to pray) in any way they want to, and to be free from fear. Go ahead, lift a torch to someone. Enjoy your freedom to do so.

That’s what our blog efforts are all about. On behalf of all of us at SkloverWorkingWisdom we wish you a happy and safe 4th of July.

© 2018 Alan L. Sklover. All Rights Reserved and Strictly Enforced.

Alan L. Sklover

Alan L. Sklover

Employment Attorney
and Career Strategist
for over 30 years

Job Security and Career Success now depend on knowing how to navigate and negotiate to gain the most for your skills, time and efforts. Learn the trade secrets and 'uncommon common sense' of Attorney Alan L. Sklover, the leading authority on "Negotiating for Yourself at Work™".

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