New Manager? – Big Risks Ahead! Eight Signs to Watch Out For

Published on April 19th, 2017 by Alan L. Sklover

 
“The paranoid person is never entirely mistaken.”

– Sigmund Freud

ACTUAL CASE HISTORIES: Quite frankly, there are so many actual case histories of “New Manager Risk” that I could write an entire book on the subject. A large part of my law practice over these past 35 years has been devoted to severance, and I have identified five or six situations where we can almost expect our client to lose his or her job. Putting aside for the moment the “large-scale downsizing” category, the “New Manager” category is one of the most common “one-off,” or individual, job loss situations.

I often describe “New Manager Risk” this way: (1) new captain takes over the ship, (2) new captain is eager to show how much improvement she can bring about, (3) he thinks his best path to improvement is the hiring of a “new crew,” (4) she thinks that people she has known from other teams she has worked with will be very loyal, as well, and (5) one by one, the “old crew” are convinced, coaxed or coerced to “walk the plank.”

Sound familiar? I’d be surprised if it didn’t.

While I am confident everyone has seen or experienced this very scenario, I am absolutely certain that everyone will, sooner or later, come across it, themselves. Hopefully, when it happens, it will not happen to you.

LESSON TO LEARN: The lesson to learn here is quite simple: if you are assigned to a new manager, or a new manager is assigned to you, you need to be at least a touch extra vigilant, and consider taking extra steps to do all you can to keep your job. So, the first step is enhanced vigilance, the subject of this newsletter.

***Note that in coming weeks, we will write another newsletter about steps you can take to counteract “New Manager Risk” in order to keep your job. It will be entitled “New Manager? – Addressing the New Risks.” In the meantime, consider what events and circumstances you should look out for, as explained below.

WHAT YOU CAN DO: Here are eight things you can be on the lookout for if either you are assigned to a new manager, or a new manager is assigned to you:
Continue Reading. . .

Sklover’s Thought for the Work Week

Published on April 17th, 2017 by Alan L. Sklover

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“There are two kinds of success, initial and ultimate.”

– Winston Churchill

In fact, initial success can be your enemy. It’s like hitting a home run in the first inning, and then sitting back to relax. . . no doubt, a sure path to losing the game. At work, when goals are set, and first steps are taken, don’t be lulled by initial success. Instead, try to learn from it. What did you do right? Might it be a coincidence? Never let up on your continuing efforts, not even for a moment, before your goal is reached in all respects. Instead, maintain your perspiration, persistence and painstaking efforts until your goal has been fully reached, in all respects, and not a moment before.

This week’s quote was sent to us by Chad, of Brooklyn, New York. Much thanks, Chad. If you would like to submit a proverb, quote or thought, please submit it to us at vanessa@executivelaw.com.

Need to send a memo or letter? Need a good checklist or form agreement? For a complete list of our Model Letters, Memos, Checklists and Form Agreements, just [click here.]

Interested in Membership? It’s free, and has advantages, including discounts on our products. Just [click here.]

Need a private telephone consultation? Just [click here.] Evenings and weekends can be accommodated.

© 2017 Alan L. Sklover. All Rights Reserved and Strictly Enforced.

A Passover Thought

Published on April 10th, 2017 by Alan L. Sklover

To All Our Friends Who Celebrate

Passover:

May your Matzoh Balls be light. May your Horse Radish be strong. May your Wine be sweet.

May you never forget how precious is Freedom from Oppression and Slavery, the meaning and lesson of this wonderful Holiday.

Have a Zinsict Pesach!

© 2017 Alan L. Sklover. All Rights Reserved

Sklover’s Thought for the Work Week

Published on April 10th, 2017 by Alan L. Sklover

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“When driving, did you ever notice that you think all drivers going slower are idiots, and all drivers going faster are maniacs?”

– George Carlin

It’s universal: we all tend to define “normal” as “me,” whether it’s politically, morally, socially, or . . . driving. At work and elsewhere, if you bear in mind that each of us sees the world through different “eyeballs,” “tinted” by different experiences, through the “lens” of varied perspectives, and imagine how the world is seen through those other “eyes,” you’ll begin to develop your own “x-ray insight” to your great advantage.

This week’s quote was sent to us by Brad of Miami, Florida. No, he is not an optometrist, but a fishing boat captain. If you would like to submit a proverb, quote or thought, please submit it to us at vanessa@executivelaw.com.

Need to send a memo or letter? Need a good checklist or form agreement? For a complete list of our Model Letters, Memos, Checklists and Form Agreements, just [click here.]

Interested in Membership? It’s free, and has advantages, including discounts on our products. Just [click here.]

Need a private telephone consultation? Just [click here.] Evenings and weekends can be accommodated.

© 2017 Alan L. Sklover. All Rights Reserved and Strictly Enforced.

“Best Excuses to Attend Job Interviews” – Five Guidelines for Choosing Yours

Published on April 4th, 2017 by Alan L. Sklover

 
“Go where you are celebrated, not tolerated.
If they can’t see the real value of you, it’s time for a new start.”

– Author Unknown

ACTUAL CASE HISTORIES: Marsha, a Payroll Supervisor at a Medical Laboratory, was recruited by a larger healthcare company for a position as Director of Compensation. The new position would be a 50% increase in compensation and offer benefits including a very generous retirement package. It was an opportunity she felt she just had to pursue.

To attend the interview, Marsha called in sick one morning at 9:00 am. At 10:00 am, she arrived for her interview and spent the entire morning meeting several people, all of who seemed quite interested in her, her experience and her skills. Afterward, she was invited to lunch, and that went even better. After lunch, she went home, elated.

The next morning, she received a meeting invitation for 3:00 pm from the Human Resources Director to discuss installation of a new payroll software program. The real meeting agenda, though, was quite different: Marsha was asked how she felt, and how she had felt yesterday – the day she called in sick. It turned out that two managers of her firm had also been at the restaurant where Marsha and her interviewers had lunch and had not noticed her to seem ill, in the least.

Long story short: Marsha was terminated for “payroll fraud,” that is, taking a paid day off for being ill when, in fact, she had not been ill. What happened to Marsha does not happen to many others, but what happened to her vividly illustrates is a risk most employees take when taking time off from their jobs – with pay – for a false reason. Being accused of “payroll fraud” is not at all good for a career as a Payroll Supervisor, or any other position, for that matter. Not at all.

LESSON TO LEARN: We have all “been there.” You are working for an employer, and either after submitting your resume, or at the request of a recruiter, you are asked to interview with a new employer. How do you get the time off to do so? There are innumerable reasons employees give for taking a morning, afternoon or even an entire day off to attend an interview. But are some “interview excuses” better than others? The answer is “yes.”

A poor “interview excuse” is one that represents a greater chance of risk or harm to your present employment relation. A better “interview excuse” is one that represents a lower chance of risk or doing harm to your present employment relation. It’s that simple.

In any workplace, you can get fired for dishonesty, as Marsha learned. She took money – salary – from her employer based on a falsehood – that she was too ill to work. While it is almost unheard of to be fired for interviewing with another employer, getting fired for dishonesty is not at all uncommon.

An additional and much more common risk is the loss of trust your manager may feel for you if she learns you have been dishonest, and are interviewing, and that she seeks to replace you before you are ready to leave.

WHAT YOU CAN DO: Most of our professional efforts are devoted to working with employees in transition, what we refer to as going “in,” “up,” or “out” of jobs. For those interviewing for new positions, we have given the best “interview excuse” issue a lot of thought, and have come up with five guidelines to help find your own best ones.

Here are five guidelines to a better excuse for taking the time off work to attend a job interview:
Continue Reading. . .

Alan L. Sklover

Alan L. Sklover

Employment Attorney
and Career Strategist
for over 30 years

Job Security and Career Success now depend on knowing how to navigate and negotiate to gain the most for your skills, time and efforts. Learn the trade secrets and 'uncommon common sense' of Attorney Alan L. Sklover, the leading authority on "Negotiating for Yourself at Work™".

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