TRENDS @ WORK – Bully Boss’ed is the New “MeToo”

Published on July 3rd, 2018 by Alan L. Sklover

bully boss trends @ work

Bully Boss’ed is the New “MeToo”

It’s a trend, and a growing trend: the workplace is becoming more uncivil, at times hostile, and more often than we’d like, downright brutal.

Fortunately, employers are also becoming increasingly aware of the many negative effects it has on their interests, including (a) increased absenteeism, (b) decreased productivity, (c) increased distraction from achieving goals, and (d) decreased retention of valuable talent. It is the ultimate “lose-lose” proposition for employers.

Nike has recently let go five executives – four male and one female – from their senior management ranks due to their bullying. One dismissed executive was expected to become the next Nike CEO. Google is now seeking to address the negative effects of bullying in their management ranks. There’s no question: bullying at work can have devastating effects to everyone, victims, bullies and all those around them, too.

In coming months, we will be posting more articles on How to Identify Bullying and Bullies, Understanding – Without Accepting – the Mind of a Bully Boss, How to Avoid Being a Bully Boss’s Victim, and What to Do If It Happens to You.

In the meantime, bear one thing in mind: “HEALTH COMES FIRST.” If you feel bullied, you should seek the help of friends, loved ones, and, possibly, health professionals, in minimizing its effects on you. There is truly nothing more important than your health.

bully boss trends @ workSecond, there are ways to try to put a halt to it, some more effective than others. Those ways will be the subject of our upcoming series of posts. As they say on TV, “Stay Tuned.”

And lastly, for now, know that many others are in “your shoes.” It is estimated that one in five American employees has been bullied. Like the “MeToo” movement, we seem to have reached a “tipping point” in response to this phenomenon, and there is, as never before, some hope to be had.

Need a private telephone consultation? Just [click here.] Evenings and weekends can usually be accommodated.

Need a model memo or letter to transmit a request or complaint? A good checklist or form agreement? For a complete list of our Model Letters, Memos, Checklists and Sample Agreements, Just [click here.]

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“You’re Not Alone . . . any more . . . at Work.”™

© 2018 Alan L. Sklover. All Rights Reserved and Strictly Enforced.

Sklover’s Thought for the Work Week

Published on July 2nd, 2018 by Alan L. Sklover

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“When you go to put out a fire, don’t bring gasoline.”

– Chris Cuomo

A few years ago, at the end of a long day, I was traveling home from my office on the Long Island Railroad. The railcar I was seated in was totally full, with no seats available. A young woman came down the aisle looking for a seat, but could not find one. She looked so pregnant as if she was due to give birth last week. No one stood up to offer her a seat. No one. I quickly got up, and gave her my seat. She could have been my daughter. I wanted to tell the men in that railcar how disappointed I was with them. I wanted to tell the women in that railcar that I was even more disappointed with them, as most had carried unborn babies, themselves. Instead, I bit my lip, and said nothing, but just stood in the aisle the whole ride home, next to the very pregnant young woman. To this day, I think my standing up quietly said more than any words could have. It was one of my proudest moments. I think I affected more people by example. Loud and mean words never say very much, or have much effect, or change many hearts or minds. I hope you agree.

This quote was something I heard on TV last week. It was about reducing the meanness, crudeness and incivility we see and hear so much of lately.
If you would like to submit a proverb, quote or thought, please submit it to us at vanessa@executivelaw.com.

Need a model memo or letter to transmit a request or complaint? A good checklist or form agreement? For a complete list of our Model Letters, Memos, Checklists and Sample Agreements, Just [click here.]

Interested in Membership? It’s free, and has advantages, including discounts on our products. Just [click here.]

Need a private telephone consultation? Just [click here.] Evenings and weekends can usually be accommodated.

© 2018 Alan L. Sklover. All Rights Reserved and Strictly Enforced.

We’re pleased to offer another new “Model Letter”:

Published on June 26th, 2018 by Alan L. Sklover

“Before Background Check – Sharing Very Personal Issues”

No one is perfect, and no one’s life history is perfect, either. So many of us have been found in possession of marijuana, or arrested for Driving Under the Influence, perhaps even alleged to have harassed someone.

If you are soon to start a new job, you are likely to be subject to a pre-employment screening, often called a “Background Check.” In many cases it is wise to share the indiscretion or very personal issue with your soon-to-be-employer before it comes up.

The worst-case scenario would be for you to resign, start the new job, and then two weeks later, be told your “past issue” disqualifies you, and are fired. Ouch! That’s not an easy thing to deal with, or explain on other interviews.

This Model Letter shows you how to address such issues in a direct, candid and forthright manner, intended to get you an “O.K.” or “No Way” before you resign and start the new position.

This particular Model Letter addresses two issues of (i) marijuana possession and (ii) driving under the influence of alcohol, but is a helpful model to address other issues, as well. (We expect to offer additional such letters in the future.) As do all our Model Letters, this Model Letter shows you “What to Say, and How to Say It.”™

*To obtain a copy of this Model Letter, just [click here.]

**To see a list of all of our Model Letters, Memos, Checklists and Agreements – that show you “What to Say and How to Say It” in hundreds of different workplace situations – just [click here].

***If you would like to arrange a Telephone Consultation with Mr. Sklover, just [click here].

“You are not alone, at work, any more.”

© 2018 Alan L. Sklover All Rights Reserved.

Sklover’s Thought for the Work Week

Published on June 25th, 2018 by Alan L. Sklover

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“There is no burnt rice to a hungry person.”

– Philippine Proverb

There is no job too boring to an unemployed worker. There is no visit too long to an elderly person. There is no unnoticed smile to a stranger from far away. There is no unneeded kindness to a lonely person. There is no bedtime story with too many pages to a parentless child. There is no coin too bent to be picked up by a penniless person. There is no shoe too worn to a person without any. We each have a unique perspective on life, don’t we?

This quote was sent to us by Kati of New London, Connecticut. On behalf of our entire blog “family,” I thank you, Kati, for this very moving thought. It was on my mind all of last week.
If you would like to submit a proverb, quote or thought, please submit it to us at vanessa@executivelaw.com.

Need a model memo or letter to transmit a request or complaint? A good checklist or form agreement? For a complete list of our Model Letters, Memos, Checklists and Sample Agreements, Just [click here.]

Interested in Membership? It’s free, and has advantages, including discounts on our products. Just [click here.]

Need a private telephone consultation? Just [click here.] Evenings and weekends can usually be accommodated.

© 2018 Alan L. Sklover. All Rights Reserved and Strictly Enforced.

Two (or More) Job Opportunities? – 18 Elements of Comparison – [Part 2 of 2]

Published on June 19th, 2018 by Alan L. Sklover

Difficult Choices

 
“It’s not hard to make decisions
when you know what your values are.”

– Roy E. Disney

NOTE: This is Part 2 of 2 of this Newsletter. We have divided it in half due to its considerable length, befitting its importance to so many employees. Last week we presented Elements of Job Opportunity Comparison 1 through 9; This week we present Elements of Job Opportunity Comparison 10 through 18. (Click here if you want to review our First Installment before reviewing this one.)

ACTUAL CASE HISTORY: Danielle, a senior marketing executive, was quite unhappy in her job. Her employer’s management was extremely dysfunctional. Sales were soft for many reasons, and, of course, much of it was blamed on her and her team. With 21 years experience, she knew her team was running on all cylinders, but even great marketing can’t undo an outdated product, an insufficient marketing budget, and almost daily interference with marketing decisions imposed by the CEO’s wife.

Without her reaching out, she was contacted by a recruiter with a very intriguing opportunity, with (a) better salary, (b) but lower bonus opportunity, (c) greater retirement benefits, but (d) later retirement age, (e) a new, exciting product line to market, but (f) a small marketing budget that gave her limited discretion. The position also came with a three year contract, but it required relocation to a city she’d never before even visited. A confusing list of advantages and disadvantages, positives and negatives.

To say it was a hard choice to make would be an understatement. Danielle knew the positives and negatives of her “bird in the hand,” but didn’t know what she would experience with the “two in the bush.”

Working with Danielle was one of my favorite client experiences. It involved first identifying, and then weighing, her personal values, career planning, life goals and difficult choices.

In the end, she made the move to the new job, and fortunately has never looked back. In hindsight, it was surely the better choice, but as they say, “Hindsight is 20-20 vision; the harder ‘sight’ is ‘insight.’”

These days many people face this dilemma, as company after company seeks to improve its human capital, expand, or just “see what is out there.” If you are in this situation, or if you receive two job offers, the decision between or among your available job opportunities might be a difficult one. Even if you find the decision an easy one to make . . . are you sure you considered all of the factors that are wise to take into account?

LESSON TO LEARN: Depending on your personal preferences, brand and skillset, as well as whether we are in “good” or “bad” economic times, it may seem that job opportunities are depressingly scarce or wonderfully abundant. Whether job opportunities are scarce or abundant, employees often have occasion to decide between (i) leaving their jobs for other offered positions, or (ii) making a choice between two or more new positions offered to them at one time. It is common that comparison of two jobs, or two job offers, can be a difficult thing to do. It is often an “apples vs. oranges” comparison, and can get quite confusing. And, so, we offer you the same list that we offer our clients to make these difficult “apples vs. oranges” comparisons.

The list we offer below has another, somewhat unintended, advantage: It may remind you of one or more job opportunity components of comparison that you had simply not even thought about. Like a checklist of sorts, it may bring to the surface of your consciousness something that had been lurking in your mind, heart and soul, that had not yet come to the surface of your awareness.

For those facing the need to make a choice between “take this job or take that one,” below is what our clients have found to be the most important elements needed to compare, and a simple way of doing so. It is not scientific, it is not foolproof, but most of my clients who have used it reported back to me that it was extremely helpful. Hopefully, it will be for you, as well.

WHAT YOU CAN DO: When you need to compare two or more employment opportunities – whether it’s a choice between two different offers, or remaining in your present job, or accepting a new offer – you need to make your decision wisely, prudently and carefully. For that reason below we present these common elements of job opportunity comparison as a “tried-and-true” method of doing so.
Continue Reading. . .

Alan L. Sklover

Alan L. Sklover

Employment Attorney
and Career Strategist
for over 30 years

Job Security and Career Success now depend on knowing how to navigate and negotiate to gain the most for your skills, time and efforts. Learn the trade secrets and 'uncommon common sense' of Attorney Alan L. Sklover, the leading authority on "Negotiating for Yourself at Work™".

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