Negotiating – The Process Archives

Heard a Recruiter is Shopping Your Job? Here’s Nine Suggested Steps

Published on December 6th, 2016 by Alan L. Sklover

 
“People don’t mind being used,
but they don’t like being discarded.”

– Unknown

ACTUAL CASE HISTORY: Barbara, a Human Resources Vice President, had worked for 12 years for a large Midwestern hospital, where she oversaw professional staff development. All seemed fine at work, and she was soon to take a vacation. She called us at the suggestion of a former client of ours.

Barbara had just received a telephone call from another HR professional she knew from attending conferences on the topic of professional staff development at hospitals. The purpose of the call from her colleague was to inquire about the hospital’s overall company culture and, specifically, its “family-friendliness.” Barbara’s colleague also asked her “Do you mind sharing with me why you are leaving?”

Leaving? Barbara had no plans to leave. The caller explained that she was told by an executive recruiter that Barbara’s position was soon to become available, and he was assembling a list of candidates to fill Barbara’s position. Barbara did not know what to say, and finally uttered, “There must be some mistake.”

Barbara found it hard to catch her breath. Was this a mistake? Was someone disappointed in her work? Her performance reviews had been “Exceeds Expectations” for years. She had not been accused of any bad behavior. Who should she speak with . . . if anyone?

Mistakes of all kinds happen. Was the caller confused about what she had heard? Was the recruiter in error? Was it possible Barbara was being replaced? Might her compensation be too high? Her creativity too low? All sorts of questions were buzzing around Barbara’s mind.

LESSON TO LEARN: In your experience, do you believe most employees find a new job before they resign from their present one? Sure, that is exactly what most employees do. Should employers do the same, that is, find a new employee before they terminate one? From their point of view, that is the exact same thing.

Is it disloyal for an employee to find a new job and then resign? No. Well, from an employer’s point of view, it is not at all disloyal for an employer to find a new employee and then terminate the one they have. Yet, most employees feel upset, perhaps taken advantage of, or abandoned, if they find out their job is being “shopped.” Why?

I think the anger, upset, even sense of being “discarded” by means of disloyalty felt by employees who find out their job is being “shopped” is due to the seeming “behind the back,” secretive nature of it all. It would seem so very “up front” to (a) be told there is a problem, and (b) work together on an orderly transition. The problem is that neither employees nor employers ever act so “up front.” They act to protect themselves and their interests. You must admit that few employees tell their employers they are out interviewing, but rather “behind the employer’s back” find a new job, and then resign.

All that said, the employee’s feelings of dishonesty, abuse, disloyalty and abandonment are real, and not to be ignored. But, your responses to hearing your job is being “shopped” cannot be based on emotions. Instead, they must be based on clear thinking, and be a focused, rational response.

If what happened to Barbara ever happens to you, what should you do? Who should you speak to . . . if anyone? Should you begin a job search of your own?

Having helped clients in this circumstance, we share with you the responses, and the order of responses, we have found are best to make in this circumstance. Taken together they represent a mindful plan of action, which is the best response of all.

WHAT YOU CAN DO: If what happened to Barbara ever happens to you, consider these steps, and, of course, modify them as seems most sensible to the specific facts, events and circumstances of your job, career and life:
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“Is threatening to file a sexual harassment complaint equal to extortion?”

Published on December 3rd, 2013 by Alan L Sklover

Question: Alan, I’ve been sexually harassed at work for years. I was once even give a “menu” of sexual acts with dollar amounts attached and told it was for supplement income. I resigned and asked for a severance to avoid legal proceedings. 

Instead of accepting my resignation, my boss gave me a raise and said I was extorting him. I fear if I go through with legal action, he will charge me with extortion.

Name Withheld
East Leroy, Michigan

Answer: Dear Blog Visitor: Your question is quite welcome because it gives me a chance to remind people about employer claims of “Extortion!!” almost every time an employee raises her or his voice and says “I have legal rights!!” 

As I have noted many times in this blog, in my experiences as a zealous advocate for employees for over 30 years, barely a single week has gone by without some law firm or some corporation calling me an “extortionist.” These days I simply laugh at such claims, because I know that it means only that they are desperate, uncomfortable, uneasy and without any true defense to what they (or their clients) have done wrong.    

1. Extortion is threatening to harm someone unless they do as you wish. Extortion could be “I will break your arm unless you give me $10,” or it could be “I will tell your husband and the local newspapers that you have been unfaithful unless you work for me for free for a week.” In either case, you are threatening to harm someone – in the first example, to break their bones, and in the second example to harm their marriage or reputation –  unless they give you something to which you have no right. 

True extortion is a very evil thing, and constitutes a very serious crime, rightly punishable by years in jail. It is for this reason that I find it so abhorrent that employers and their legal counsel use false allegations of “extortion” to drive fear into the hearts of so many abused employees.  

2. Extortion includes threatening to say or write something that will harm someone, whether or not it is true. Whether something negative about a person is true or false is irrelevant to whether or not it is extortion. So, for example, if a person is not a tax cheat, but you threaten to tell people that the person is a tax cheat unless he gives you money, that is extortion. And, too, even if the person is truly and provably a tax cheat, your threatening to tell people that unless he gives you money, it still is extortion.  

Experience teaches us that threatening to expose someone for doing something they do, in fact, engage in that is either embarrassing, immoral or illegal is, in fact, more threatening than a false allegation, because at least in the case of a false allegation, the allegation can be disproven.   

3. Extortion does NOT include threatening to file a legal claim or complaint at work, to a rights agency, or in Court. With one exception (explained below), it has been established and accepted that threatening to file a legal claim for sexual harassment, or other violations of law, is not extortion. This is the case even if you say or write, “Unless you settle this claim for at least $100,000, I will sue you for sexual harassment.” Bringing a case to Court, or threatening to do so unless you have a certain, minimum settlement, is most definitely NOT extortion. Rather, it is the way people have always, and will always, avoid, prevent and limit unnecessary lawsuits.  

4. Threatening to go to the press with accusations of sexual harassment, or to make public statements, IS extortion; threatening to file a sexual harassment claim in Court – though Courts are open and public – IS NOT extortion. You might say to yourself, “What is the difference between (a) going to the press, and (b) going to Court, which often ends up in the press?” If you did think that you would be raising a great question. Our legal system views those two things entirely differently, and punishes one while it promotes the other. Why?  

The reasons for the distinction, and the difference in treatment afforded the two behaviors, are twofold. First, Court proceedings entail scrutiny, and through cross-examination and the like, test the authenticity and accuracy of Court claims. On the other hand, statements made in private to persons, or to the press, are rarely given such thorough confrontation and examination. So, what you write and say about, or in, Court proceedings are a kind of “protected” communications, and not punished. 

Second, as noted above, it is by making claims and making settlement “demands” to address damages caused by improper conduct, such as sexual harassment, that we limit and prevent potentially unnecessary lawsuits. And, you can be sure, the Courts love to eliminate unnecessary lawsuits by prior settlement of claims. 

5. There is one EXCEPTION to this general rule: if the claim is entirely made up, in BAD FAITH. If anyone reading this article is thinking, “Oh, great, I think I will make up, out of thin air, a sexual harassment claim, and try to win some easy money that way,” FORGET ABOUT IT. Our legal system has a way of identifying and ferreting out entirely baseless, false and made up claims of harassment.  

That said, don’t think that a valid claim, even if not won in Court, will bring about financial or other jeopardy to you. It would take actual proof of bad faith – such as an audiotape in which a supposed “victim” admitted an intent to concoct a false story to bring about legal or financial jeopardy for brining a claim into Court. That is so very rare that I know of no such case. But entirely and provably false claims of sexual harassment – just like entirely false allegations of extortion, are wrong, and should be punished to the fullest extent possible under law.  

6. Here are two illustrative examples of where it was determined “non-extortionate” to threat of legal action for sexual harassment that were in the news in recent years. A few years ago the then-Governor of New Jersey, Jim McGreevy, was a married man with a young child. According to press reports, he received a telephone call from a lawyer who said words to the effect, “Governor, my client is a man, and he says that you told him he would not keep his job unless he engaged in sex with you. We want $5 million to settle, or we are going to go to Court.” Governor McGreevy called the FBI to report what he claimed was extortion. The FBI disagreed, advising the then-Governor that threatening a lawsuit if a certain settlement is not offered is NOT extortion. Because the claim turned out to be true, the then-Governor simply resigned.

Also a few years ago, according to press reports a TV talk host named Bill O’Reilly received a call from a young woman he employed as an assistant producer who told him that his insistence upon “talking dirty” on the telephone with her must stop, and she was going sue him for sexual harassment unless they reached a settlement for millions of dollars. She also mentioned to him that she had audiotaped some of the “dirty talk” sessions, and because they were a kind of evidence, they would likely be played in open Court. He sued her for extortion, and the Court promptly threw the case out, ruling that what she had done was NOT extortion. 

7. To protect yourself from allegations of extortion, when you raise and request resolution of legal claims for such things as sexual harassment, it is wise to limit your communications to written ones. As I noted above, because I raise legal claims on my clients’ behalf almost every day, I am called an “extortionist” by opposing attorneys quite often. To protect myself from such pathetic allegations, when I raise legal claims I try to limit my communications to written form, preferably email, so that it cannot be alleged that I did commit extortion. Those who wish to raise such allegations, and insist on severance or other financial restitution/resolution, might consider doing so as well.     

8. Employers’ allegations of extortion are usually nothing but fear-mongering; DON’T FALL PREY TO IT, PLEASE. I want you to know that I fully understand and appreciate the fear you feel that your employer may threaten to sue you for extortion, or file some sort of criminal complaint against you. Though I do not know all of the facts, events and circumstances of your situation, I don’t sense you are in any legal or other jeopardy on this basis.  

I do know this: fear is not a productive emotion, and that it is used so very often to frighten good, honest, hardworking people who are not rich or powerful from standing up for themselves and exercising their legal rights, as the law permits them to do.  

Should you have the need, we offer a Model Complaint of Discrimination, Harassment or Hostility that you can adapt to  your own  facts, events and circumstances. “What to Say and How to Say It.”™ To obtain a copy, just [click here.] Delivered by Email – Instantly! 

Thank you for writing in. I hope this proves helpful, and that it dispels or at least reduces the fear you feel. I wish you the very best.

Deadlines are important; don’t let your severance deadline expire. To help you ask for more time, we offer our Model Request for More Time to Review/Sign Your Severance Agreement. It shows you “What to Say and How to Say It.”™ To obtain a copy, just [click here.] Delivered by Email – Instantly! 

My Best,
Al Sklover 

P.S.: You might be interested in our Master 94-Point Severance Negotiation Checklist, to give you the peace of mind and freedom from worry that you forgot to raise or entertain certain points of discussion and negotiation. To obtain copy, just [click here.] Delivered by Email – Instantly!

Repairing the World,
One Empowered – and Productive – Employee at a Time™

© 2013, Alan L. Sklover All Rights Reserved. Commercial Use Prohibited.

“If I negotiate, will my severance be taken off the table?”

Published on February 28th, 2013 by Alan L Sklover

Question: If you are given a severance agreement, are in a “protected class,” and decide you want to attempt to negotiate the agreement, can the 21 days to sign the severance agreement be extended, or will the former employer take the severance offer off the table?

Dan
Benicia, California

Answer: Dear Dan, Sorry to seem so “wishy-washy,” but the answers to your questions are “Yes, No, Maybe, and It Depends. ” Hey, I am a lawyer; did you really expect a quick, easy answer? Truth be told, the answers you seek require a bit of explaining, so here we go:         

1. A severance agreement is a kind of contract, and what most attorneys call “contract law” is basically the same everywhere. Though this might be obvious to you, it is not known by many people. A severance agreement is a contract in which (a) the employer offers the employee certain things – usually (a) some monies, (b) some benefits, and sometimes (c) some services (like outplacement or career counseling) in exchange for the employee’s promises not to do certain things, such as (d) not to sue the employer, (e) not to take property of the employer, and (f) not to spread around the employer’s secrets. Of course, there are many variations, but that is the “basic deal.”   

2. The basic “law of contract offers” is simple: if an “offer” is made and it is said that it will be available for, say, 21 days, then it must stay “on the table” for that long, unless it is rejected before the 21 days. For this reason, your severance offer will almost undoubtedly remain “on the table” and thus available to you to accept, for the full 21-day period . . . unless, that is, you say either “No thank you – I reject it,” or “Here is a my counter-offer,” which is a kind of rejection. If you reject it, or counteroffer it, then your severance offer “can” be “taken off the table,” and may be.   

3. However, it is very unusual for a severance offer to be “taken off the table” for three important reasons. First, if your employer really wants to take the severance offer “off the table,” chances are they never would have put it “on the table” in the first place. Second, if your employer takes your severance offer “off the table,” then you really have nothing to lose by hiring a lawyer (what most employers call a “gorilla”) to threaten or sue them, which is exactly what the employer wants to avoid in the first place. Third, if your employer takes your severance offer “off the table,” then you have nothing to lose, and everything to gain, by doing the exact things they are trying to avoid: lawsuits, telling secrets, taking property, etc. Most employers understand this, and don’t take severance offers “off the table” for a very long time. I have negotiated severance agreements for over a year without them being taken “off the table.”  

As you may know, my book on severance negotiating, “Fired, Downsized, or Laid Off,” is generally considered the best book there is on the subject. If you would like to purchase a copy of it by instant download from your desktop printer, just [click here.] Alternatively,  you may obtain an e-book version of it by [clicking here.] 

4. In my 30+ years of severance negotiating, I think I have seen severance offers taken “off the table” for failure to meet a deadline perhaps just twice, maybe three times. As I suggested above, it is exceedingly rare for an employer to say, in effect, “You missed the deadline; therefore the severance offer is ‘off the table.’” That said, it cannot be denied that it could happen to you, and it may be wise to take prudent steps to prevent that.  

5. The safest thing to do in your situation is, first, to request – by email – an extension of time to consider and discuss a resolution. In other words, ask your Human Resources representative for a written commitment to extend the time to accept your severance agreement  – or reach some other negotiated resolution – from 21 days, to, for example, 35 days. The best way to do this is by email, as soon as possible, and noting a good reason for the extra time being needed, such as difficulty finding and meeting with an attorney, to review it. The only commitment for more time you can rely on is one in writing, or email; do not rely on spoken “commitments.”  

6. The next step to begin to take is your actual “negotiation,” that is prepare a request for additional severance, and mention (a) your “protected class” status, and (b) at the end, insert a plea for “no retaliation” for raising these issues. I hope you have spent some time reviewing our blogsite’s Resource Center section on Severance Negotiating so you can become familiar – if not expert – on how to negotiate severance successfully. 

It is best done by means of (a) a letter sent by email, (b) not addressed to Human Resources, but rather to a person of authority in the employer, (c) that gives a good reason to believe that you have not been treated legally or according to policy, (d) that presents a proposed severance that you think would make the giving up of your claims a deal you could accept, and (e) that makes a clear request, in the last sentence or two, that you not be retaliated against. That is how it is best done, anywhere, anytime, in any company. I don’t guarantee results; the method, though, is really the best.    

One of the very most popular of our Model Letters is our “Model Memo Requesting Additional Severance.” It has been used by hundreds of people with success. To obtain your copy, which will show you “What to Say, and How to Say It,”™ just [click here.]  

 7. Why does this work so well – especially if you are in a “protected class?” Because to then take away your severance offer could be perceived as an illegal retaliation, which is a significant violation of law. The law says that it is illegal for employers to discriminate against certain people on the basis of age, gender, race, etc., and especially those who are in “protected classes.” (“Protected classes” are those groups whose members have been historically denied equal employment opportunity.) 

The law also says that it is illegal to retaliate against an employee who has objected to illegal retaliation. Illegal retaliation claims are often easier to prove than discrimination claims, much more readily accepted by juries, and in fact won almost all the time by former employees making the retaliation claims. It is for this reason that employers are fearful of retaliation claims. 

If, in your response to your severance offer, you write back that you believe you have been fired, downsized or laid off because you are a member of a “protected class,” then, if the severance offer is later pulled “off the table,” you could argue in Court, quite convincingly, that their doing so was in retaliation for your raising your claim of illegal discrimination. 

It’s for this reason that a person in a “protected class” who wants to negotiate severance is almost always given the extension of time they request, and additional extensions, too, and rarely is any severance offer in such circumstances ever taken “off the table.”  

Dan, answering your question has taken many words, but when it comes to helping my blog visitors, and “repairing the world,” I’d rather be extra careful than not careful enough. Most of all, I hope this has been helpful.

Deadlines are important; don’t let your severance deadline expire. To help you ask for more time, we offer our Model Request for More Time to Review/Sign Your Severance Agreement. It shows you “What to Say and How to Say It.”™ To obtain a copy, just [click here.] Delivered by Email – Instantly!

My Best,
Al Sklover

P.S.: You might be interested in our Master 94-Point Severance Negotiation Checklist, to give you the peace of mind and freedom from worry that you forgot to raise or entertain certain points of discussion and negotiation. To obtain copy, just [click here.] Delivered by Email – Instantly!

Repairing the World –
One Empowered and Productive Employee at a Time ™

© 2013 Alan L. Sklover, All Rights Reserved.

“Can I request severance or a cash settlement to keep quiet about an illegal practice by my employer?”

Published on January 12th, 2012 by Alan L Sklover

Question: I have been asked to keep quiet regarding my employer’s knowingly overcharging a customer on a contract price component while my company pockets the extra profit.

I am ready to resign but want to settle regarding keeping this quiet in exchange for a cash settlement. Can this be done?    

Dean
Camas, Washington

Answer: Dear Dean: I am glad you wrote in. If you try to do what you seem to be considering doing, you could possibly go to prison for a long time for committing a very serious crime: extortion.                

1. It is a serious crime – extortion – to say, in one way or another, “I will tell people something about you unless you pay me money.” Or, “I won’t tell people something about you unless you give me money.” And, in the law, it doesn’t make a difference whether what you are threatening to tell people is true or false. In fact, it is often the true things that people do that they are most frightened will become public knowledge.   

2. Extortion is just like armed robbery, but without being armed with a weapon. Most states define extortion as the gaining of property or money by almost any kind of threat, including threat of violence (“I will break your leg if you don’t give me $1,000.”), unfavorable government action (“I won’t approve your zoning application unless you give me sexual favors.”), or harm to reputation (“Unless you give me $100, I will tell people you are a child molester.”)

If, however, you have a gun in your hand when you say these words, and thus make the other person feel a threat of imminent physical danger, you are then committing armed robbery. Incidentally, extortion commonly carries just as long a prison sentence as does armed robbery.  

3. In requesting severance or a settlement, if you have a valid legal claim – such as if you were sexually molested by a boss, or if you were fired because you refused to go along with theft from a client – you can say “I will go to court, and raise these issues in Court, unless I get a settlement for my damages.” Isn’t saying that the same thing as extortion? No, not at all, because you can only go to Court if you have a valid legal claim, and not a made up one. In fact, if you made up a claim without basis in fact, and then went to Court, you could in fact be accused of, and possibly convicted of, extortion. Court is a public place, that is true, but a threat to go to Court with a valid legal claim is not extortion, though many people feel that way.

4. Many lawyers who help people gain better severance packages are called “extortionists.” Dean, I can’t count the number of times I have heard people call me that name. However, I know that I must believe my client is telling me the truth about a legal claim, I must believe he or she has a valid legal claim, and I am very careful not to threaten “You’ll be exposed,” but rather “You’ll be sued.” Being a lawyer, you tend to get used to people calling you vile things.

5. Here’s a real illustration of a demand for a settlement or severance package that was not extortion: A few years ago, the then-Governor of New Jersey got a telephone call from a lawyer who said, in effect, “My client is a man, and he says you told him he could have a state job only if he had sex with you. He has a valid sexual harassment claim. Unless you settle for $5 million, we will bring you to Court.” The Governor called the FBI and said, in effect, “I am being extorted.” The FBI said, “No, you are not. A threat to go to Court with a valid legal claim is not extortion.” That is really what happened. Oh, yes: that Governor did admit what the lawyer claimed was true, and then resigned.

I believe that, if the same lawyer said “If you don’t settle for $5 million, I will go to the newspapers,” then that lawyer would probably be in prison today. I hope you see the difference. 

If you feel you do have a valid legal claim against your employer, you may be wise to consider requesting a severance package even before one is offered to you. We offer a Model Letter to Proactively Request a Pre-Termination Severance Package. If you’d like to obtain a copy, just [click here].

And, if you think you’d like to consult with an experienced employment attorney in the Seattle, Washington, area, we offer a list of them by simply [clicking here].

Dean, I hope this is clear to you. If not, I strongly suggest you speak with a local lawyer before doing what you seem to be considering doing. I know that this can sound a lot like “lawyer-talk,” but there is a real difference – in fact and in the law – between threatening exposure and threatening a lawsuit based on a valid legal claim.

Thanks for writing in. Good luck in your upcoming transition.

Deadlines are important; don’t let your severance deadline expire. To help you ask for more time, we offer our Model Request for More Time to Review/Sign Your Severance Agreement. It shows you “What to Say and How to Say It.”™ To obtain a copy, just [click here.] Delivered by Email – Instantly!

My Best,
Al Sklover

P.S.: You might be interested in our Master 94-Point Severance Negotiation Checklist, to give you the peace of mind and freedom from worry that you forgot to raise or entertain certain points of discussion and negotiation. To obtain copy, just [click here.] Delivered by Email – Instantly!

Alan Sklover’s Timeless Classic, Newly Updated and Revised

Fired, Downsized, or Laid Off:

What Your Employer Does NOT Want You to Know
About How to FIGHT BACK

Now available by Instant Download to Your Tablet
(Ipad, Nook, Kindle, etc.)

OR

Instantly Downloadable PDF to Your Home Printer

FOR EITHER METHOD JUST [CLICK HERE]

One Empowered and Productive Employee at a Time™

© 2012 Alan L. Sklover, All Rights Reserved.

“How long is an offer of severance good for?”

Published on September 22nd, 2010 by Alan L Sklover

Question: I am 64 and expecting to get an early retirement/severance agreement. Once offered, how long is the offer valid?

If I ask for more and the company rejects my offer, does it negate the original offer?

         Ernie 
         Chicago, Illinois 

Answer: Dear Ernie, How long the offer is valid depends on the words of the agreement, which must be read carefully. 

That being said, it’s almost definite that the words of your agreement will provide you with either twenty-one (21) days, or forty-five (45) days, in which to accept the offer. It’s a bit complicated, but two federal laws that protect older employees from discrimination (Age Discrimination in Employment Act, or “ADEA,” and the Older Workers Benefit Protection Act, or “OWBPA”) require that either 21 days, or 45 days, be provided, depending on your circumstances. I’m certain one or the other of these two federal laws applies to you. Be sure to read your agreement carefully.

As to asking for more severance, it’s a matter of basic contract law that, if you make a “counter-offer” to an “offer,” the original “counter-offer” acts as a “rejection” of the offer, permitting the party making the offer (here, your employer) to negate or withdraw the original offer. Your concern, and forethought, are wise.

In practical terms, though, it is quite rare for an employer to withdraw a severance offer because an employee asked for improved terms. That is because employers actually want their employees to accept the severance offers given to them, and by doing so eliminate you from their workforce, without any disputes or litigation. If they withdrew your offer, you would have very little alternative but to sue them for age discrimination, or some other alleged transgression, which is the very thing they seek to avoid by offering you severance in the first place. There is an old Italian proverb that illustrates this point well: “Beware of the man with nothing to lose.”

Every step involves risk, and taking no steps involves risk, too. We usually recommend to our clients that they ask for better terms of severance in an email (a) with respect, (b) accompanied by a good rationale or reason you believe you deserve it, and (c) a reminder to your employer that to withdraw your original offer would seem to be illegal retaliation, which is an issue all employers want to avoid if at all possible.

I can’t say you should do this, but I can say that most of our clients approach the problem this way, and is quite rare that an employer ever even suggests withdrawing the original offer. Usually, the worst an employer does is say, “No.” And the best is that they get part of, or all of, what they asked for.

If you would like further information about the severance process, in general, [click here.]

If you are interested in obtaining a model letter illustrating how to best request better severance, [click here.]

Hope this helps. Thanks for writing in. 

Deadlines are important; don’t let your severance deadline expire. To help you ask for more time, we offer our Model Request for More Time to Review/Sign Your Severance Agreement. It shows you “What to Say and How to Say It.”™ To obtain a copy, just [click here.] Delivered by Email – Instantly!

My Best,
Al Sklover

P.S.: You might be interested in our Master 94-Point Severance Negotiation Checklist, to give you the peace of mind and freedom from worry that you forgot to raise or entertain certain points of discussion and negotiation. To obtain copy, just [click here.] Delivered by Email – Instantly!

Alan Sklover’s Timeless Classic, Newly Updated and Revised

Fired, Downsized, or Laid Off:

What Your Employer Does NOT Want You to Know
About How to FIGHT BACK

Now available by Instant Download to Your Tablet
(Ipad, Nook, Kindle, etc.)

OR

Instantly Downloadable PDF to Your Home Printer

FOR EITHER METHOD JUST [CLICK HERE]

© 2010 Alan L. Sklover, All Rights Reserved.


Alan L. Sklover

Alan L. Sklover

Employment Attorney
and Career Strategist
for over 35 years

Job Security and Career Success now depend on knowing how to navigate and negotiate to gain the most for your skills, time and efforts. Learn the trade secrets and 'uncommon common sense' of Attorney Alan L. Sklover, the leading authority on "Negotiating for Yourself at Work™".

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