Sklover Working Wisdom Tax Relocation Expense Reimbursement

. . . Yes, the 2018 “Tax Reform” law in the U.S. made employer-paid and employer-reimbursed relocation costs – even when your moving is requested by the employer – income to the employee, and thus taxed to the employee? Yikes!

We all should know that wages, salary, bonuses and employer-granted grants of stock are “income” to the employee, and thus subject to taxes to be paid by the employee.

Some of that changed in the U.S. this year due to our “friends” in Congress, and their so-called “Tax Reform” law that lowered taxes on the wealthy.

Under previous tax law, payment OR reimbursement of most of an employee’s job-related moving expenses were not subject to income taxes or employment taxes (such as Medicare or Social Security.)

However, under last year’s so-called “tax reform” legislation, employers now must include all moving expenses – whether paid by the employer OR reimbursed by the employer – in the employee’s income that they report annually to the IRS.

Employees are warned to take this change into account when considering whether to accept a relocation request, as moving oneself, or an entire family, can be awfully expensive, and doubly so when the amount paid or reimbursed by the employer is also subject to taxes.

You may want to request that your employer (or prospective employer) not only pay for or reimburse you for your relocation costs, but also agree to “Gross Up” that amount that is, also pay you what you will need to pay in taxes, to make up that “tax difference” to you. Alternatively, to “repay” you in some way to address this new tax burden on you.

If you are not familiar with the concept of “Tax Gross Up,” look for our upcoming newsletter to be entitled “Tax Gross Up: What Does That Mean?”

“Knowledge is leverage. Forewarned is forearmed. Look before you leap.” That’s our motto at SkloverWorkingWisdom.com.

[Written and transmitted May 8, 2019.]

(Please note: This email newsletter does not constitute legal or tax advice; for such advice or counsel, you need to consult a lawyer or tax adviser. In addition, laws change, and that includes the present tax law noted above, and, so, reliance upon this email newsletter must take these warnings into account.)

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