Question: In evaluating my performance during my Performance Improvement Plan, management told me my production is not up to what it should be. However, my position is not under any production standards. Any recourse?

Martha
Weston, West Virginia

Answer: Your recourse lies in “Pushing back against your PIP.” Sadly, Performance Improvement Plans (or “PIP’s”) are so often used as a cynical ploy to remove employees, or to intimidate them into quitting. What is the first sign that a PIP is being misused? When it simply doesn’t make sense, as seems to be the case in your PIP. How can a person whose job has no standards for production not be meeting production standards?

You do have recourse, and it will take some effort on your part.

First, view our Video, entitled, “Performance Improvement Plans – How to Respond.” You can do so by [clicking here]. We offer a 10-minute, step-by-step approach to recourse.

Second, we have several articles and Questions & Answers in our Resource Center of our blogsite. By [clicking here] you can read others’ questions and our answers to help you in your “push back.”

Finally, we offer a Model Letter to Help You Push Back at a PIP, or our Ultimate Package of Model Letters, Memo’s and a detailed Checklist for Pushing Back at a PIP. These items are what you probably need to get you started in “pushing back” effectively. If you’d like a copy, simply [click here.]

Best,
Al Sklover

Help Yourself With
These Unique PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT PLAN (PIP) Materials

PIP 1: Model Response to Receiving a PIP
PIP 2: Model Second Response if Your First Response Does Not Work
PIP 3: 152- Point Step-by-Step Guide and Checklist for a PIP
PIP 4: 3 Memos Seeking Feedback of Clients, Customers, Colleagues for Use in PIP Pushback
PIP 5: Final Memo to Delay PIP Conclusion to Continue Job Search
PIP 6: After Successful PIP Pushback, Suggesting Positive Next Steps

[ Click Here ] and Go to Section "H"


 
© 2009 Alan L. Sklover, All Rights Reserved.