eye

It happens to me nearly every day; in fact, it happened to me just last week. When discussing language in a legal document with an employer’s HR or Legal representative, I am told “That is standard language. So, we can’t change it.”

I know why they say that: they are fearful. You see, “long, long ago, in a land far, far away,” some attorney prepared that “standard language,” and this person I am dealing with today is fearful that, if he or she makes a decision to change it today, it could be a mistake. So, it’s easier to use the excuse of “standard language” than to use their brain to address the opportunity, problem and people counting on us to do so.

To get past that, I remind this person of three points: first, this problem is not “standard,” but arose from “substandard” events, so its solution cannot be “standard.” Second, this opportunity is not standard, so the language we need to use is not going to be “standard.” And, third, these people are unique and special, so our efforts on their behalf require unique and special language.

What am I really saying? In essence, “The people you and I represent want this problem to be solved, or this special opportunity achieved. We should try “special” hard to make sure that gets done. They deserve an extra ounce of thought and an extra pound of courage from us . . . otherwise they will not be happy with the outcome . . . or us.”

If you are ever uncomfortable with the “standard language” put in front of you to sign, and are told “It is standard, so we can’t change it,” think of these “non-standard” arguments to overcome such nonsense.

Sure, you should say it “softly,” and sure, you should say it “simply,” and, too, you should say it with “sincerity.” Get past the “standard” argument, and get to the “special” one -the one that works- you and your employer want.

You are not standard, and your employer is neither. Instead you and your employer are worthy of the effort and fortitude that this problem, solution, opportunity and situation need. It’s like buying shoes . . . they’ve got to fit your feet.

This usually works for me, I am confident it will likely work for you, as well.

Observe and Learn.
Then Negotiate.

Need to send a memo or letter? A good checklist or form agreement? For a complete list of our Model Letters, Memos, Checklists and Sample Agreements, Just [click here.]

Interested in Membership? It’s free, and has advantages, including discounts on our products. Just [click here.]

Need a private telephone consultation? Just [click here.]

© 2018, Alan L. Sklover All Rights Reserved. Commercial Use Prohibited.